Sep 082010
 

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 which provides a,

legal and political framework that acknowledges the importance of the participation of women and the inclusion of gender perspectives in peace negotiations, humanitarian planning, peacekeeping operations, post-conflict peacebuilding and governance.

Key provisions of 1325 include:

  • Increased participation and representation of women at all levels of decision-making.
  • Attention to specific protection needs of women and girls in conflict.
  • Gender perspective in post-conflict processes.
  • Gender perspective in UN programming, reporting and in SC missions.
  • Gender perspective & training in UN peace support operations.

On September 21, I’ll be giving a presentation titled, Towards a Women-Inclusive Peace:  Why 1325 is the Crucial Number at Mount Mary College in Milwaukee, WI at their International Day of Peace celebration, co-sponsored by  the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

I’m very excited to be speaking about 1325, which is something I regularly address when talking about the impact that militarism has on women’s lives.  It is particularly timely now that we’ve officially declared an end to combat missions in Iraq. But just saying it’s over doesn’t make it over if you are a widow without any substantive means of support or of you are a mother living as a refugee in Syria or Jordan forced to prostitute yourself to feed your children.  These examples point to why it is so important to consider the needs and listen to the voices of women when resolving conflict.

I’ll post the text and slides from the presentation after the event but in the meantime, here are some links for learning more about 1325.

If your school or organization would be interested in a presentation about how militarism impacts women’s lives and this very important resolution, please contact me at lucindamarshall @ feministpeacenetwork.org.

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 September 8, 2010  Posted by on September 8, 2010

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