May 032008
 

In its annual exercise of misogynist myopia, Time Magazine has decreed that only 25% of the world’s most influential people happen to be women, and at that 8 of those women are in the arts and entertainment field (although 3 of them were listed in the Heroes and  Pioneers category).

So, much like the list of 1000 women who would be good candidates for the Nobel Prize was put together several years ago, looks like we need to come up with our own list.  So use the comments section to add your favorite nominee/list any relevant organization or why you are making the nomination and we’ll put together a list to send to Time.

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 May 3, 2008  Posted by on May 3, 2008

  9 Responses to “Time Magazine Doesn’t Think Women Are Influential”

  1. I think it will be interesting – the list you come up with, to send to Time. I think that we need quota’s in all previously ‘male dominated’ positions…to see women suceeding in various fields. 25% is very low…I’m surprised if this is indeed correct?

  2. Feel free to click on the link and check my math :-). I am already starting to get suggestions for names, will compile a preliminary list early in the week and post it and yes indeed I do plan to send it to Time. So if you have suggestions for names, please post a comment with your ideas!

  3. […] Well here it is, the opening salvo of the “It’s About Time” list of influential women that Time should have included in their list of 100 influential leaders.  We need more names!  Let’s make it clear that far more than 25% of the influential people on this planet happen to be women.  By perpetuating the diminishing of women’s leadership and influence, Time deprives us of valuable insights and contributes to the toxic perception that the lives and work of women is less important than the contributions of men. […]

  4. Aung San Suu Kyi, leader of the nonviolent movement for human rights and democracy in Myanmar, and Nobel laureate.

    Shari

  5. Tina Fey. She may seem just funny, but how many articles have we seen recently about how she’s proving women can be true comedians?

    Tyra Banks. A 10+ season tv show, a 3+ season talk show, broke tons of barriers for black women…I’m writing an entry on her for the Oxford Encyclopedia of African American history and she’s a pretty incredible businesswoman, not just a model.

  6. […] Also, notably, as Lucinda Marshall points out: “8 of those women are in the arts and entertainment field (although 3 of them were listed in the Heroes and Pioneers category).” Here are the women that made the cut (two listed with their partners): Michelle Bachelet, Nancy Brinker, Mariah Carey, Cynthia Carroll, Hillary Clinton, Miley Cyrus, Mia Farrow, Sonia Gandhi, Elizabeth Gilbert, Mary Lou Jepsen, Wendy Kopp, Neelie Kroes, Stephanie Meyer, Lorena Ochoa, Suze Orman, Angelina Jolie (as a couple with Brad Pitt), Susan Soloman, Suzanne Wright (with Bob Wright), Jill Bolte Taylor, Oprah Winfrey, Alexis Sinduhije, Indra Nooyi, Madeeha Hasan Odhaib, Carine Roitfeld, Yoani Sanchez, Aung San Suu Kyi […]

  7. […] The number of stories about women reported across the media spectrum is also disproportionately low and the stories covered more often than not are either about women being victimized or about the latest shocking behavior of a starlet.  Rarely  are women portrayed as empowering voices. Female members of Congress, for instance get less press mentions than their male counterparts and this year’s Time Magazine list of 100 influential leaders only included 25 women. Female voices in the literary world are also similarly shut out.  Last year’s National Book Awards all went to men. […]

  8. […] The number of stories about women reported across the media spectrum is also disproportionately low and the stories covered more often than not are either about women being victimized or about the latest shocking behavior of a starlet. Rarely are women portrayed as empowering voices. Female members of Congress, for instance get less press mentions than their male counterparts and this year’s Time Magazine list of 100 influential leaders only included 25 women. Female voices in the literary world are also similarly shut out. Last year’s National Book Awards all went to men. […]

  9. […] Once again, Time Magazine is asking us to vote for the 100 most influential people in the world.  Remember last year’s list?  Women comprised a whopping 25% of the total, and I say whopping because this year, we are being asked to choose from 204 possible choices of whom 40.5 are women.*  Which is less than 20%.  So are we less influential or is Time merely more misogynist? Here for your head-banging frustration are the women, and their position on Time’s list. #4  Tzipi Livni #7 Ariana Huffington #11 Katie Stam #13 M.I.A. #27 Sarah Palin #29 Britney Spears #30 Miley Cyrus #31 Angelina Jolie #33 Hillary Clinton #38 Oprah Winfrey #39 Tina Fey #40 Michelle Obama #41 Katie Couric #59 Sheila Bair #62 Meredith Whitney #65 Michelle Rhee #66 Nancy Pelosi #67 Elizabeth Warren #84 Linda Avey and Ann Wojcicki #91 Doris A. Taylor #94 Connie Hedegaard #96 Rachel Maddow #98 Kate Winslet #116 Danica Patrick #118 Jessica Flannery #128 Sonia Gandhi #136 Yoani Senchez #137 Madeeha Hasan Odhaib #139 Aung San Suu Kyi #144 Nancy Brinker #147 Mary Lou Jepsen #154 Suze Orman #155 Sister Mary Scullion #156 Stephenie Meyer #158 Indra Nooyi #170 Nadya (Octomom) Suleman (note–they threw in the Octomom qualifier, not me) #172 Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio #173 The View (all 5 of them count as one) #176 Angela Merkel #180 Stella McCartney #194  Taylor Swift […]

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