Jan 312007
 

Reprinted with kind permission from the Coalition of Women for Peace:

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Annual Report 2006

2006 was yet another year of turbulence – the sudden disappearance of Sharon, the election of Hamas, the Lebanon War, the battering of Gaza…

In the Coalition of Women for Peace, we responded to these dramatic events, while pursuing our strategy of outreach to Israelis who do not share our views. It has been a year of non-stop activism for a just peace. We report here on some highlights.
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 January 31, 2007  Posted by on January 31, 2007 Comments Off
Jan 302007
 

Talk about urban renewal with an attitude. Just when we were recovering from Joe Francis and the (underage) Girls Gone Wild, along come the guys at Kink, a web-based porn company which just bought an old armory building that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. According to the ooze and ahhh’s of the San Francisco Chronicle, Kink plans to use the building, which used to be a military induction center and has been deserted since 1970, to shoot porn films for their websites. The building is oh-so-right for them because it includes a basement that can be used as a dungeon and a boiler room that is just perfect, according to Kink filmmaker James Mogul,

“You could put a girl right inside the boiler,” he said. “Why not? It’s a nice little chamber.”

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 January 30, 2007  Posted by on January 30, 2007 2 Responses »
Jan 302007
 

What excellent news! The U.S. Army is dropping its subpoena against journalist Sarah Olson in the US v Watada Court-Martial. In a press release, Olson had this to say about the decision:

“This is obviously a great victory for the principles of a free press that are so essential to this nation. Personally, I am pleased that the Army no longer seeks my participation in their prosecution of Lieutenant Watada. Far more importantly, this should be seen as a victory for the rights of journalists in the U.S. to gather and disseminate news free from government intervention, and for the rights of individuals to express personal, political opinions to journalists without fear of retribution or censure. I am glad the growing number of dissenting voices within the military will retain their rights to speak with reporters. But I note with concern, that Lt. Watada still faces prosecution for exercising his First Amendment rights during public presentations. The preservation of these rights clearly requires vigilance.”

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 January 30, 2007  Posted by on January 30, 2007 Comments Off
Jan 292007
 

IRIN News, a part of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, recently ran this poignant look at what life in Baghdad is like, written by Lina Massufi, an Iraqi widow with 2 young children. She writes,

“I cannot stand the constant military raids in my home. Every time they [the soldiers] raid my house, they break the door. They don’t know how to knock at a door. One day, when I asked them why they were entering like that instead of ringing the bell, they laughed at me and called me an idiot.

My furniture is all broken into pieces because of the way they conduct their searches. I no longer have dishes or glasses to speak of because they destroyed most of them during the raids.

“I have two children and for most of the time, they are scared. Muhammad, a four-year-old, cannot sleep well at night. He has nightmares every day and when he wakes up he cries, asking me not to let the soldiers take him as they took his uncle.”

As I am posting this, I am sitting in my warm home, sipping coffee in a nice china mug, as my son sleeps soundly in his bed. All I can do is weep.

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 January 29, 2007  Posted by on January 29, 2007 Comments Off